Gonzo’s favorite things: romancing the kong

Gonzo loves playing tug, hanging out with other dogs, and helping out in the kitchen, but possibly more than all of these things, Gonzo loves romancing a kong. His tenacious terrier nature really goes on display when you give him a food-stuffed kong to chew on. You can almost hear his little heart sing in happiness. Even his ears are cocked in concentration:

Gonzo’s favorite things: helping

Mr. Gonzo Bunny-Ears is ever so helpful in the kitchen. He has picked this skill up from his big foster brother Chick, who is always willing to help clean up– whether the excess be on the floor, in a bowl, stuck to the back of a spoon, or dripping down mom’s leg.

Gonzo was not a natural kitchen-dweller when he first came to us, but he sure did learn fast. As long as there is a dog bed nearby from which both wonderdogs can watch all the action, both Gonzo and brother Chick will lay obediently in their assigned spot instead of getting underfoot. With one exception:

Something about the sound of the hand mixer sends a signal to their brains — and a pavlovian response kicks in, forcing them to leap out of their spot and bound over to where I am standing, butts wiggling out of control.

For more info about adopting Gonzo Bunny-Ears, contact us at DCpetographer [at] gmail [dot] com or through Partnership for Animal Welfare.

Gonzo’s favorite things: big brothers

In case it hasn’t been totally clear from reading our blog over the past few weeks, Gonzo absolutely adores his big brother. He follows Chick around everywhere and is always trying to play with him and snuggle on him. He hits Chick over the head with toys trying to entice him to play chase, and regularly sits down directly on top of a sleeping Chick as though it were the only seat in the house, even when it’s super hot and snuggling makes no sense. Lately, he has taken to imitation as his favorite way to flatter his big foster brother. Sometimes we come into a room to find them sleeping in the exact same pose, like this.

The way in which little Mr. Ears has bonded with Chick has made us pretty sure that whoever adopts him will have to have another dog to keep him company, or at least a few kids in the 6+ age range. He really thrives off company more than your average dog.

For more info about adopting Gonzo Bunny-Ears, contact us at DCpetographer [at] gmail [dot] com or through Partnership for Animal Welfare.

how to make a doubledog sleeping bag

By request, I’m posting an explanation of how to make a dog sleeping bag similar to the one Mr. Gonzo Bunny-Ears and Chick have been modeling over the past few weeks, especially here.

The final dimensions of our bag are 35 inches deep by 31 inches wide. I wanted a bag that was small enough to be cozy but big enough that Chick could get in and turn fully around so his face could point outward, and this seemed like the right size. Turns out it’s the perfect size for Chick, but also the perfect size for 50 pound Chick and 35 pound Gonzo.

The dimensions of the fabric that I’ve listed are estimates – I don’t think I measured when I first put this bag together, and if I did, I definitely didn’t write the measurements down.

I sewed this using a regular low-end sewing machine, though it would have been much easier (read: fewer jams) if I had a heavy-duty machine. It would also be possible to sew this by hand, of course, though it would take more time and patience.

A final note: I am not an experienced seamstress and in fact I have only sewn a few things in my life, which explains the lack of actual sewing terminology below. Hopefully this is easy to follow anyway.

MATERIALS:

Red fleece. 40”x70”. I used the most heavy-duty fleece I could find.

Beige fleece. 40×70”. For the inside of the bag, I opted for the kind of fleece that resembles lambsfleece.

Quilt filling or egg crate mattress topper: 36×30”. I used quilt filler and actually had to sew it to the fleece, but if I did it again I would use the egg crate mattress pad and simply make a pouch for it just like the instructions below show.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Place red fleece and beige fleece on top of each other with the right sides facing. Sew around the to long sides and one short side using a double straight stitch, about an inch in from the edges.

Turn right side out, so the seams are hidden. Place the foam or filler on top of the fleece, arranging it about two inches from the unsewn edge. Mark the fabric about 1-2 inches from the other side of the foam or filler, and sew with a double straight stitch. Slide the foam or filler in to the slot you have made for it.

Fold the sleeping so that the short sides are aligned, with the inside out (red fabric should be on the inside).  Sew with a double-straight stitch or hand-finish to bind the two edges together.

Turn your bag inside out, and enjoy!!

a game for you, readers.

You know that fun game in which you look at two pictures and try to figure out what is different between them? Sometimes in the newspaper it’s a drawing of two city scenes or maybe a jungle, and you have to identify a monkey that has a tail in one photo and doesn’t have one in another? Alternately, they used to have a similar game at seedy bars on these weird bar-top computers, and the images you were comparing were two scantily-clad ladies?

Well, let’s play that game. I’ll give you a couple of big clues. First, there really is only one difference between these two photos, although they are different photos. And second, Gonzo is a VERY messy water drinker and we are always amazed at the sprinkling of water all over the kitchen after he is through.

Good luck!

rescue adoptions: one group’s perspective

We are fostering Gonzo through a different group than we went through for Lollie, so we are in the middle of a steep learning curve of rescue philosophy. It’s been interesting for me, because my natural inclination is more aligned with the “no-kill nation” philosophy of getting as many animals into seemingly good homes as possible, than with the more common rescue group approach of searching very carefully for the most perfect home possible. Both approaches have their points, but the debate between them is not the subject of this post.

Many rescue groups — including Partnership for Animal Welfare (PAW), through which we are fostering Gonzo, ascribe to the latter of the two approaches above.  In many cases the dogs taken in by rescues have been victims of irresponsible dog ownership, which makes a rescue that much more discerning in reviewing potential adopters.  PAW devotes a lot of time and money to the dogs it selects, through foster care, extensive vet treatment (including major medical — one of the few groups in the DC area to take dogs who need serious surgery), training, and PR.  Because of the rather large investment, PAW feels a responsibility and a right to be very selective and thorough in picking exactly the right home for a dog.  Whereas most any responsible adult can go to a shelter and adopt a great dog, adopting through some rescues is a much more involved process — one with a number of steps and a lot more scrutiny, but with a payoff: arguably greater peace of mind, because in adopting from a rescue and out of foster care, a family can know much more about the dog’s personality, preferences, medical history.

Through the process of fostering Gonzo with Partnership for Animal Welfare, we have learned a lot about how applications are picked, which are considered “strong,” and which are not. Here are a few guidelines that I have observed based on recent applications for Gonzo.   They may offer a bit of insight into what rescue groups look for, but specific qualifications will vary a lot from dog to dog and from group to group.

1. Pet as family member. Sometimes I am amazed at the seeming lack of care with which people fill out their applications, or the different standards people have for what is normal. People who plan to keep the dog outside or in the basement, or admit to going to the vet “only in emergencies” are going to be tossed aside pretty quickly.

2. A compatible family composition. People who live alone and travel extensively for work will raise red flags. Dogs are very adaptable, but having to stay at the kennel or at mom’s house every other week while an owner travels is not ideal. Likewise, if the dog is a bit snappy, growly, or very energetic, it probably isn’t best for a family with a young child. If the dog is very timid, it won’t go well with a family with several tweens. If the dog is dog-reactive or thinks of cats as snacks, an application with other pets in the home will probably be declined.

3. Stabiliy. Many pets are given up to shelters when an owner or family moves, divorces, loses a job, moves in with a new partner, etc. Most of these are impossible to predict, but there are some signs that rescues may look for — a very young adopter in his early 20s, or somebody in the military who may be placed overseas, is not seen as the strongest candidate for a rescue adoption.

4. Housing constraints. We foster pit bull type dogs, which means they can’t be adopted by somebody who lives in a county with breed-specific legislation (aka BSL, or a ban on particular breeds like pit bulls) or an apartment or house with similar constraints. Many people are surprised to learn that their apartment does not allow bullies, but it’s unfortunately a very common rule. If a dog is a fence jumper, it can’t go to a house with a 3′ chain link fence, unless the family is committed to building a taller fence or only walking the dog on leash.

5. The vet check. Most rescues will call the current or prior vet used by a prospective adopter to find out the record of shots, vaccines, and medicines. If an applicant is overdue for several important vaccines or tests, the application may be declined — although you can be a perfectly responsible pet owner and accidentally miss a vet appointment now and then, missing vet checkups doesn’t reflect well.

6. Experience level. Some dogs are much better suited for people who have substantial dog experience, while others are easy and care-free, and could be great for a first-time dog owner. Our first foster Lollie needed an experienced dog family who was willing to work with her, while Gonzo is easy, and would make an ok first. But still– many rescues feel more comfortable placing dogs in the hands of experienced dog people, even for easy dogs.

7. Lifestyle issues. Gonzo, for example, does not like to be alone. All dogs are social, but Gonzo really does seem to suffer from a higher level of stress than others. When he is with us and/or our Chick, he is a different dog. Mellow, happy, and relaxed. When he is alone, he worries. Extensively. So for him, the best kind of family will be one where somebody is at home a lot, or there is another pet in the house. Singles or couples who live alone and are away for a standard 8 to 7 workday would make wonderful dog parents to many dogs, but probably not to Gonzo — this little fella just needs more.

After considering all of these issues, it’s easy to see why a dog in rescue care could receive a number of applications before being matched with an adopter who truly is a perfect fit. And if I ever have the opportunity, I like to remind people who are interested in, but not able to adopt Gonzo — he sure is cute, but he really isn’t unique. Our shelters and rescues (including, in our area, MCHS, WHS, and WARL) are full of wonderful dogs with big warm hearts and cute, expressive ears, who deserve nice homes just as much as our foster. He happens to be lucky to be an internet star with his own blog, but that doesn’t make him any more worthy of a good family’s love. In fact, all of those dogs who spend their days in a cold, barren cage with nobody taking cute pictures probably need their attention more than our Gonzo does.

variations on semi-in

Gonzo Bunny-Ears has really taken a liking to Chick’s sleeping bag that I made him a few winters ago. He loves burrowing inside for naps when he has grown sleepy. Occasionally he manages to get in on his own, but usually he needs a little help opening the bag up first. Or else we end up with a situation in which Gonzo is fast asleep, but only semi-in the sleeping bag. Like this:

Or this:

Or this:

For more info about adopting Gonzo Bunny-Ears, contact us at DCpetographer [at] gmail [dot] com or through Partnership for Animal Welfare.

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